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Reconsidering Identity Economics: Human Well-Being and Governance Laszlo Garai

Reconsidering Identity Economics: Human Well-Being and Governance

Laszlo Garai

Published December 1st 2016
ISBN : 9781137525604
172 pages
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 About the Book 

In 2003 I published in Hungarian a book entitled Identity Economics. Supposedly its approach to the topics of behavioural economics had been rather timely, from the fact that seven years later the Nobel prize winner George Akerlof (together with a... MoreIn 2003 I published in Hungarian a book entitled Identity Economics. Supposedly its approach to the topics of behavioural economics had been rather timely, from the fact that seven years later the Nobel prize winner George Akerlof (together with a co-author) published their book of the same title. The content of two monographs is quite different from each other but their logic is the same: the behavioural economics within the economic psychology must be complemented by an identity economics. The book is aimed toward both undergraduate and postgraduate students studying economics, sociology, politology or psychology in English-speaking universities in US, UK, Canada, Australia and other not perforce English-speaking countries. Their enrollment numbers are approximately 50-200 per university. My project would be suitable as the main reading, as long as my above mentioned Identity Economics is not yet translated from Hungarian into English (originally this monograph has been written as based on the texts I am actually proposing). The proposed book secondary market is represented by the staffs of the universities and academic research institutes. As far as I know the only title to be mentioned is the George Akerlofs and Rachel Krantons Identity Economics: How Our Identities Shape Our Work, Wages, and Well-Being (Princeton University Press, 2010). However, it is not competing proposed monograph but the two are complementing each other (see the long paragraph comparing the two theories in the entry Identity Economics of the Wikipedia)