Home » Dhamma by Jonah Rye
Dhamma Jonah Rye

Dhamma

Jonah Rye

Published September 14th 2014
ISBN :
ebook
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

The environment is heavy with the memory of conflict, rank with the spoils of aid and corruption, infused with exploitation, violence, impunity. After the genocide.When the girl was still very young two boys came. They selected her. There is a placeMoreThe environment is heavy with the memory of conflict, rank with the spoils of aid and corruption, infused with exploitation, violence, impunity. After the genocide.When the girl was still very young two boys came. They selected her. There is a place where you will make a great deal of money they told her. And you wont pick up garbage. Here there is danger, but with us you are safe.The story of a girl taken and the trio of misbegotten believers who make her redemption their duty.Girls talked about getting money, pay the debt. Get out. Freedom. But I knew. They knew. No getting out. The debt never goes away.PIRATES follows with the story of a country girl in her quest for a better life in the city.Mea left her home, her people, her roots, her world. Packing hope and determination and two changes of clothes in a cardboard suitcase tied with plastic twine, she stepped off and went to the city, far away, too far to come back. She wore a new shirt and a new hat of blue plastic straw, rolled the narrow brim of her hat on one side smart, hank of hair clipped at her forehead. Her parents were losing their daughter, their help, thought it better for her to stay and marry, but she promised there would be dollars, dollars to send home. They paid the bus fare, one way. The good life is elusive. Mea goes to work in a sweatshop, endures hardships and tests, and confronts evil.Set in the razing of the rainforest, the title chapter of Part II pits compassion and courage against greed and villainy.Hornets. Black, armored, lurk above, pace the convoy. Soldier shadows, M16s at ready, wait grim in the open ports. In command chopper, shadow mounts heavy machine gun, barrel tipped earthward. Stinger and Hellfire hang primed. Wait . . .Live rightly. Fly headlong. Never any need to tell the other rangers or the police. No need to go to the army. Nothing to be done. It was understood. And now he hoped against all that he knew, that they - police, army, authority - would desist, would not retaliate, not turn on him. He could go home, to his baby son, to his daughter grown to girlhood without him, precious daughter who needed him for her to grow up safe, to grow up free, fulfilled. To his wife, young, and beautiful as her children. All of them vulnerable. Prey. He hoped, he prayed. Flew forward, flew away.